Cloud-based services keep global sourcing market on growth trajectory

The global sourcing market maintained its growth trajectory in the second quarter, boosted by growing demand for cloud-based as-a-service solutions, according to the latest state-of-the industry report from Information Services Group (ISG), a global technology research and advisory firm.

Data from the ISG Index™, which measures commercial outsourcing contracts with annual contract value (ACV) of $5 million or more, show second-quarter ACV for the combined global market (both as-a-service and managed services) rose 5 percent, to $13.7 billion.

It was the third consecutive quarter the combined global market surpassed $13 billion in ACV, but the first time in the last three quarters it did not establish a new quarterly ACV record, falling just shy of last quarter’s record $13.9 billion.

As-a-service sourcing registered its second-best quarterly ACV ever, at $6.7 billion, up 14 percent over the prior year.

 Both Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), at $4.9 billion, and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), at $1.8 billion, were up 14 percent. IaaS, long the growth engine of this segment, trailed off sequentially this quarter due to slowness in Asia Pacific, particularly China, while SaaS recorded its fourth consecutive record ACV quarter as it climbs toward the $2 billion mark.

Managed services, at $7 billion of ACV, achieved only the seventh quarter this decade at or above that level, but nonetheless dipped 3 percent versus an exceptionally strong second quarter last year.

The 491 contract awards in the latest quarter, up 1 percent, kept alive a string of six consecutive quarters above 400 awards – a sign of both strong demand and continuing market fragmentation.

Within managed services, IT outsourcing (ITO), at $5.3 billion, was down 7 percent in the second quarter, reflecting the continuing shift of data center infrastructure to the cloud.

Business process outsourcing (BPO), meanwhile, climbed 14 percent, to $1.7 billion, on strong demand for horizontal back-office functions such as finance and accounting and procurement, as well as in the facilities management space.

“The global commercial outsourcing market is stable and healthy,” said Steve Hall, partner and president of ISG. “Despite macro-economic and geopolitical risks, technology spend continues to increase. With the rapid changes in digital business, shifting consumer demands and increased competition, enterprises can’t afford to hit pause. We likely will see some macro-economic headwinds before the year is out, but the technology tailwinds are far stronger.”

For the first half, ISG reported combined market ACV of $27.6 billion, up 10 percent. The growth was driven entirely by as-a-service, which, at $13.7 billion, climbed 23 percent, with IaaS up 28 percent, to $10.1 billion, and SaaS up 9 percent, to $3.6 billion.

Managed services overall was flat, at $14 billion, with ITO also flat at $10.9 billion. BPO was down 1 percent, to $3.1 billion. As-a-service in the first half represented 49 percent of the combined market, versus 44 percent in the same period last year.

Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA)

EMEA’s combined market ACV of $5 billion was up 3 percent versus last year. In the managed services segment, ACV was $3.2 billion, about even with the first quarter, but down 1 percent versus a year ago. The two consecutive quarters above $3 billion may signal a return to sourcing levels last seen in 2015. The bulk of managed services ACV came from ITO ($2.7 billion, up 2 percent). Europe continued its shift to as-a-service, now 36 percent of the combined market, with ACV of $1.8 billion, up 9 percent. IaaS, at $1.3 billion, was up 7 percent, while SaaS, at $491million, was up 16 percent. Growth in the Nordics, Benelux and Southern Europe offset slight declines in DACH (Germany, Austria and Switzerland), France and the U.K., as Brexit uncertainty persists.

Americas

In the second quarter, combined ACV in the Americas rose 6 percent, to $6.5 billion, on the strength of robust demand for as-a-service, which now represents a record 57 percent of the market. As-a-service ACV climbed 23 percent in the quarter, to $3.7 billion, including $2.6 billion for IaaS, up 29 percent, and $1.1 billion for SaaS, up 12 percent. Managed services, meanwhile, declined 10 percent, to $2.8 billion, as ITO slumped 22 percent, to $1.8 billion, even as BPO surged 25 percent, to $1 billion.

Asia Pacific

Combined market ACV in Asia Pacific reached a record $2.2 billion, up 6 percent. On the strength of larger awards, managed services produced its best quarter in five years, with ACV of $967 million, up 15 percent. China, South Korea and India had the largest gains, offsetting weakness in Japan and Australia/New Zealand. As-a-service, flat at $1.3 billion, eclipsed the $1 billion ACV level for the sixth straight quarter, amid uneven IaaS results in China, which pushed regional IaaS down 3 percent, to $1.1 billion. SaaS, meanwhile, rose 18 percent, to $206 million.

“We are projecting 22 percent year-on-year revenue growth for the remainder of 2019 in the as-a-service market,” said Hall. “This takes into account a slightly more optimistic view of the SaaS segment and factors in some uncertainty in IaaS, particularly in China and elsewhere in Asia Pacific.

“In the overall IT and business services market, we are raising our growth forecast slightly, to 3.5 percent, through the end of the year. However, given some of the macro-level trends, we will remain alert to any negative developments that could signal an overall downward trend.”

www.isg-one.com

[South Africa] Barko Financial Services chooses Temenos cloud software to deliver personalized digital customer experiences

Temenos, the banking software company, has announced that Barko Financial Services has selected Temenos software to replace its legacy systems, in both core and front office, to offer a compelling and personalized customer experience.

The microfinance institution will use cloud-native, cloud-agnostic Temenos T24 Transact, the next generation in core banking, and Temenos Infinity, the breakthrough digital banking product.

Barko Financial Services is in the process of applying for a banking license with the ambition to launch a retail bank that will challenge the status quo in South Africa by offering financial products aimed at better meeting the needs of lower-income South African consumers – Temenos will provide the technology to enable this strategy.

The microfinance institution has over 170 branches and caters for millions of modest-earning, but salaried South Africans such as government employees, mineworkers and civil servants.

Currently, it takes Barko Financial Services 25 minutes to onboard a client and 10 to 15 for a new loan application. With Temenos’ packaged, integrated software, Barko Financial Services will dramatically reduce the time to originate loans, targeting re-loan applications to be completed in under two minutes and new loan completion in under seven minutes.

The aim is to give customers, who are mostly located in rural areas, a compelling digital experience using mobile devices, thereby eliminating the need to visit a branch.

By selecting Temenos’ end-to-end digital banking platform, Barko Financial Services will benefit from accelerated project timelines and drastically reduced cost of deployment. The microfinance institution is expected to go live in six months.

Cloud-hosted Temenos Infinity will allow Barko Financial Services to gain product agility and take new products and services to market faster. Temenos T24 Transact will enable the business to benefit from operational efficiencies at a lower cost of ownership.

Temenos has more than 25 years of global banking expertise and a local presence in Africa. Temenos consistently invests over 20% of its revenue into continually enhancing its packaged software, to develop the richest and deepest functionality in the industry.

Kobus de Wet, Chief Executive Officer, Barko Financial Services, said: “We are delighted to be working with Temenos as our strategic technology partner. Temenos has a worldwide reputation for robust, scalable banking software and an extensive presence in the African region. We selected Temenos’ packaged and open banking software to transform our customer experience, offer personalized products and services and drastically lower our total cost of ownership. With Temenos, we will be able to launch capabilities faster, if we get approval to establish a bank, and provide innovative products which are simple to use and tailored to add value to our target customers. We wish to offer lower-income customers a personalized experience that is typically reserved for private clients.”

Jean-Paul Mergeai, Managing Director – Middle East and Africa, Temenos, said: “Technology is playing a pivotal role in making financial inclusion a viable option for everyone. We are delighted to partner with Barko Financial Services, which joins the Temenos family, and it can leverage our experience of serving over 220 microfinance institutions as well as our expertise in helping new banks to launch. By selecting our cloud-native, cloud-agnostic packaged software Barko Financial Services will benefit from a fast implementation. Barko Financial Services will be best positioned to leverage technology innovation to offer an outstanding customer experience at a reduced cost. We look forward to working with Barko Financial Services as it transforms the services that it offers to its customers.”

www.temenos.com

www.barko.co.za

SEACOM upgrades CloudWorx for public cloud networks and data centres in South Africa

Moving to meet the requirements of an evolving corporate ICT marketplace, Pan-African Internet and connectivity service provider SEACOM is expanding its CloudWorx cloud connectivity solutions. 

CloudWorx is a versatile, private connectivity service for businesses that connects corporate customers directly to the leading cloud-service providers like Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud Platform.

Until now, SEACOM’s CloudWorx was primarily provisioned through the provider’s network interconnections with data centres in Europe and was exclusive to companies in Johannesburg and Cape Town.

The revised and upgraded CloudWorx continues to provide low latency and secure access when connecting to cloud providers overseas, but now also includes access to public cloud networks and data centres located in South Africa – accomplished via SEACOM’s presence in open-access Teraco Data Environments.

In addition, as SEACOM extends its South African national network, CloudWorx will increasingly be available to corporate customers outside the country’s major metros.

The shift in scale of CloudWorx availability reflects SEACOM’s growth as a connectivity and business solutions provider.

Approved by regulatory authorities on 1 March, SEACOM has acquired 100% of FibreCo Telecommunications, a national fibre network with infrastructure, connectivity services and over 60 Points of Presence across South Africa.

This ever-expanding footprint will bring SEACOM cloud connectivity solutions, like CloudWorx, to businesses in hitherto neglected economic centres such as Bloemfontein and East London.

Whether your requirements are to connect to the newly-launched Azure or AWS data centres in South Africa or Google and Oracle based out of Amsterdam, SEACOM has the presence, infrastructure and scalability to help South African (and East African) businesses fast-track and support their cloud migration strategy.

The FibreCo acquisition introduces over 4700km of national fibre, in addition to SEACOM’s pioneering subsea cable system connecting East Africa to South Africa, Europe and Asia.

This robust network lets SEACOM customers take advantage of a high-speed, flexible and resilient backbone from an end-to-end perspective. International capacity on the SEACOM network is currently lit at 1.5 Tbps and the South African national backbone is being upgraded to 1 Tbps.

Across the board, fibre access is uncontended and unshared to provide corporates with carrier-grade, scalable connectivity.

Scalability and general fluidity are key considerations for South African businesses to future-proof their cloud migration strategy. Cloud provider requirements may switch between public Internet access and dedicated private connectivity.

Meanwhile, individual businesses may see their cloud usage change in line with their growth strategy, using office software-as-a-service today and data-intensive AI analytics tomorrow.

As Robert Marston, Global Head of Product at SEACOM, explains, “Through SEACOM’s investments in undersea & terrestrial fibre, coupled with its interconnections with the major Cloud Providers both locally and internationally, SEACOM has the highest-speed bandwidth, low-latency routing, and a comprehensive set of options to ensure its clients can make effective use of the Cloud services in their businesses.”

Although it has benefits for medium to large businesses in all sectors, SEACOM CloudWorx is versatile enough to cater for industries such as the Mining Sector who may have limited requirements for cloud connectivity, to the Financial Services Sector, which has strict security and throughput requirements driven by their day to day operational needs.

 In these applications, utilising software-as-a-service platforms, hosted in a cloud environment, results in increased speed, security and application efficiency.

With CloudWorx users experience higher security, lower latency, increased reliability and greater speed in comparison to public Internet connectivity to cloud platforms.

In line with SEACOM’s commitment to growing business in Africa, CloudWorx is a specialist approach to cloud connectivity that prioritises flexibility and scalability for customers. Local organisations can leverage it to improve their efficiency and competitiveness as the wholesale digitisation of work takes hold.

www.seacom.com

[[$links]]

[Column] Hans van Linschoten: Data sovereignty in Africa, why you should care

African businesses are currently making massive investments in things like machine learning and artificial intelligence tools and are using cloud and virtualized infrastructure to enhance service delivery.

Talking with industry leaders and experts across the continent, one thing is clear, they’re making these investments because they want to adopt the flexibility and benefits of the cloud.

The cloud services sector in Africa might be in its early stages of development, but the impact is already far-reaching. Large firms are using compute capabilities and AWS database to transform how they reach a predominantly mobile and digital customer base. A number of African cloud-native startups are also leveraging the cloud to disrupt the entire industry.

There is significant potential in the growing African cloud market where an estimated $2 billion is being spent in cloud this year. This, together with all cloud related businesses happening in Africa, tells you how much businesses can benefit from cloud.

Even as this happens, there’s one concern that cannot be ignored when it comes to matters of cloud; the physical location of data centers. This is because data sovereignty is a crucial factor in many countries.

Data sovereignty is the concept that digital data is subject to the laws of the country in which it is processed. Data stored in Uganda for example falls under Uganda’s privacy laws (The Data Protection and Privacy Act, 2019), as well as data that flows within its borders.

With the increase in Software as a Service (SaaS) and cloud storage services in recent years, their use often entails cross-border data transfers, which can result in major compliance challenges for users and even the providers. Once your data travels outside of a country’s borders it becomes subject to the law(s) of the land in which it is stored.

The main concern associated with data sovereignty is maintaining privacy regulations and keeping foreign countries from being able to sub open data. This here is the very reason why African businesses need to care.

This can be a complex legal issue that has the capacity to affect organizations worldwide.  For example, we can have a Kenyan cloud service provider that has its main office including accounting, sales and marketing and even operations in Uganda while their customer service call center is in Germany. This implication here is that certain personal information about accounts must be sent to Germany in order for them to contact clients and provide support. If Germany’s Privacy Principles (APP) stipulate that the cloud provider must disclose what information is being sent out of Germany, then there’s the potential for an organization’s personal data to be sub opened by a foreign government. In some countries like Indonesia, regulators stipulate that financial data cannot be stored outside the country without approval. 

There are clear regulations which we cannot run away from and need to be observed. Most established organizations I engage with that are actively embracing cloud, care deeply about where their data resides. Some African banks already have regulations requiring financial data to be stored in their countries and this is a good starting point.

Bottom line, having data in the cloud offers many benefits; it allows for easier flow of information and for safe and easy remote backup of files and data and in many cases, saves cost.

African developers and organizations should see this as an opportunity to tap into local cloud solutions to ensure data sovereignty is observed.  The more data sovereignty we have in Africa, the better protected Africans are by African privacy laws and the less reliance there is on internet infrastructure from outside.

Hans van Linschoten is the founding partner of Imprimatur Capital Africa and CEO of afriQloud

www.afriqloud.com

Also read: 

Launch afriQloud: Leapfrogging Africa’s innovation agenda with local cloud solutions

[South Africa] Teraco to invest $71 million in expansion of its data center campus to respond to growing cloud uptake

In its largest infrastructure build project to date, Africa’s neutral data center provider has announced that it will be expanding the Teraco Isando Campus (JB1).

 Increased demand for additional data centre capacity is being driven by cloud uptake and enterprise organisations wanting to access the Teraco platform.

The expansion will occur in two phases. Phase 1, currently underway, will grow the facility by 2 000 cabinets bringing the total JB1 Campus capacity to 5 700.

Total usable floor space will increase by 4 000 square meters, expanding to a total of 12 000 square meters across the data centre campus. The anticipated ready for service date is in Q3 2019.

A total of 60MW of power will be reticulated to the site addressing requirements for further expansion after Phase 1 has been completed. The total power available to the Isando Campus will now reach 80MW.

Jan Hnizdo, Chief Financial Officer, Teraco says that he sees continued demand for Teraco’s services given the unique business model and secular growth trends as the African continent continues to digitally transform. The Teraco Campus expansion follows on from the recently launched Riverfields hyper-scale data centre facility in Bredell.

Hnizdo says that funding for the build is via a combination of internally generated funds and enlarging existing debt facilities from R1.2bn to R1.8bn. “Our debt funding partners, Absa, continue to be highly supportive of our business model and are key partners in Teraco’s growth strategy”.

Teraco’s offering to clients of resilient data centre facilities allows for a choice of over 300 telco’s providing connectivity to Africa and the lowest latency interconnection points to cloud and content.

Hnizdo says that with the recent announcements of direct interconnection availability to the major cloud onramps such as Amazon Web Services Direct Connect and Microsoft Azure ExpressRoute, Teraco has seen a growing uptake driven by the enterprise market.

“The Teraco platform allows enterprises to have direct private connections to all the leading cloud providers in the most latency efficient and resilient manner possible. Enterprises can deploy their public, private and hybrid cloud strategies from the Teraco platform which allows for complete freedom of choice from a cloud provider perspective, as well as significantly reducing the time and cost for enterprises to access these cloud platforms”.

Over the past decade, Teraco has focused on growing its ecosystems of telco, content, financial services, enterprise and service providers. Its offering is underpinned by providing clients with direct access to Africa’s largest Internet exchange, NAPAfrica, which includes all the benefits of interconnection via the Teraco platform.

Hnizdo says that Teraco is committed to growing its capacity footprint across its core hubs, thereby ensuring that clients have certainty and the flexibility of expansion to take part in the digital transformation that is happening across sub-Saharan Africa:

“Teraco continues to invest significantly into the region’s ICT infrastructure and has built what is now Africa’s largest data centre. We take pride in our vendor-neutral offering, with open access to interconnection and world class resilient data centre infrastructure for all our clients”.

www.teraco.co.za

[Column] Gerhard Fourie: Streamlining data management in a multi-cloud environment

Many organizations find themselves in a situation where they have multiple clouds to manage. This often results from using numerous Software as a Service (SaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS) solutions.

Moreover, the cloud is fast becoming the preferred method of delivery for an ever-increasing range of services and solutions across the globe. However, a multi-cloud environment vastly increases the complexity of data management, especially when data resides in various clouds both public and private in a number of different countries. To prevent costs from spiraling and loss of control over data, it is essential to reduce this complexity. Streamlining data management is more important than ever in a multi-cloud environment.

More clouds, more complexity

Cloud service providers are rapidly expanding their geographies, driven by requirements for reduced latency and data sovereignty. The result is an increasing number of places where data could potentially be stored. This is further complicated by the various data governance regulations around the world, which have an impact on data management.

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) pushed out by the European Union has had the most significant impact. This regulation has effectively forced organizations to understand what data they have and where they are keeping it. South Africa’s Protection of Personal Information (PoPI) Act has similar requirement.

Essentially people want transparency and accountability from organizations around their personal data. While there are penalties for improper data collection and handling, the reputational damage that could result from data mismanagement is the biggest risk factor. Knowledge is key. Enterprises must have a handle on what data they have, how they should classify it, how sensitive it is, and where they are storing it. Multi-cloud environments compound this challenge, as data can be more difficult to manage when it resides across multiple public and private cloud platforms as well as on premises.

Siloes and security concerns

In an effort to remove data siloes, data management became increasingly centralized. Now, with the emergence of multi-cloud environments, the challenge has once again reared its head. Data has once again become decentralized, and with it the potential for siloes of information. The ease of obtaining cloud solutions means that often business units will simply ‘buy’ a new tool without informing IT. With each department having its own systems and services, there is once again a lack of single view of the customer. These systems may not be part of the organizational backup and recovery strategy, leaving data vulnerable.

Security also remains a challenge. While every cloud is secure, as cloud vendors stake their reputation on delivering secure infrastructure, it is the responsibility of a business to secure the workloads, data and applications that are being stored in the cloud. It is essential to understand where data could be exposed, and ensure that data is protected at rest, in transit and in storage. It is essential to examine infrastructure, solutions and data across the board to ensure that various clouds, their data, are included in management strategy.

Leveraging the benefits of multi-cloud while minimizing the complexity

Multi-cloud offers the flexibility to leverage the strengths of each platform to obtain best of breed tools and resources for every business requirement. However, the nature of multiple solutions inevitably increases complexity. Organizations need to pay attention to integration, data flows, data protection and data management.

Minimizing complexity begins with having a data management strategy in place, and understanding what data you have and where it resides. The second step is to consolidate tools. May organizations have multiple tools for backup, disaster recovery, archiving and so on, and there is often a lot of overlap. A single data management toolset for cloud and on premises data significantly streamlines the work. It also ensures that a single view of data can be obtained for increased speed and efficiency.

A platform that offers automation, orchestration, artificial intelligence and machine learning options can help organizations save both time and effort by replacing manual tasks. In addition, a platform that has native integration with clouds enables a single interface to be used for backup and recovery across the board, saving time and reducing complexity. Finally, any data management solution should incorporate the ability to quickly move large workloads and data volumes, and should support the various tools used to achieve these migrations.

Multi-cloud is the reality of data management infrastructure, and the challenges will only continue to grow as cloud becomes increasingly available and pervasive. Organizations need to simplify and streamline their data management to reduce cost and complexity as well as to manage data regulation and compliance objectives.

Gerhard Fourie is Commvault District Channel Manager for South Africa

Motorola Solutions launches cloud-based push to talk service in EMEA

Motorola Solutions has launched WAVE – the new, network-independent multimedia communication subscription service in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA).

 The cloud-based push-to-talk (PTT) service connects teams and enables real-time group communications using any device from smartphones to two-way radios, tablets and PCs to broadband devices.

In addition to its cloud-based WAVE service, Motorola Solutions is introducing its new purpose-built WAVE Radio: the TLK 100.

The TLK 100 combines the functional benefits of WAVE with a rugged radio form factor for professional users. The device provides businesses with instant push-to-talk communication across Europe, utilizing 3G, 4G or Wi-Fi networks without the need for costly or time-consuming spectrum licensing or manual programming.

The rugged PTT device is ideal for industries like construction, transportation, energy, private security, and more. Businesses can easily manage their workforce using the integrated GPS to maximize safety, check project status, find faster routes, modify tasks, and position team members where they are needed most.

A new WAVE Mobile Application enables workers to turn their phone into a broadband PTT handset and get instant communication anywhere they have broadband service.

Users can connect their two-way radio system to WAVE, extending coverage and allowing smartphones to communicate with radio users. Integrated messaging also enables them to push text, video, audio, photos and files to individuals or groups as well as coordinate meetings based on location sharing.

Motorola Solutions also offers a WAVE Dispatch Application to further simplify day-to-day broadband PTT group communications. With WAVE Dispatch, businesses can manage their resources and coordinate an effective operation from any internet connection with a standard browser.

They can keep in touch with their teams to ensure that they have all the information they need. Workforces can also be deployed more efficiently through location updates and mapping.

“We see a growing demand from businesses that need to connect their teams via easy-to-use push-to-talk services in the field,” said Viv Francis, vice president, channel sales EMEA at Motorola Solutions. “They need future-leading technologies for group-based broadband communications, plus purpose-built devices that function at the push of a single button to improve employee efficiency.”

www.motorolasolutions.com

Datacloud Africa Leadership Summit launches inaugural cloud excellence awards in Africa

Datacloud Africa Leadership Summit has launched a new Awards Ceremony to recognize data centre and cloud excellence during the last 12 months across the African continent.

Nominations are open for the inaugural Datacloud Africa Awards which will be held on the evening of 26th September where winners will be announced in the following categories:

1. Africa Data Centre Service Provider of the Year Award
2. Africa Cloud Service Provider of the Year Award
3. Excellence in the Data Centre Award: Africa
4. New Data Centre of the Year Award: Africa
5. Global Connectivity for Africa Innovator of the Year
6. Africa Data Centre Location of the Year Award
7. Africa Data Centre Energy Innovator of the Year

“It is very timely to showcase and honour the achievements of leading companies in the colocation, cloud services, energy and data centre sectors in the Africa region. We will also recognise development agencies, governments and trade associations who have positioned Africa as a data centre investment in the Africa Data Centre Location of the Year Award,” said Philip Low, chairman of BroadGroup.

Chairman of the Judging Panel Gerd Simon also added that “The Datacloud Africa Awards offers a platform for the industry to demonstrate leadership, excellence and innovation and we encourage companies in the Africa region to put their nomination forward and we wish you good luck in this awards process.”

“An objective of all Awards is to recognise best practice in Africa. In setting the bar higher yet again, these Awards will provide new goals for the extraordinary talents across the continent operating and engaging in data centre and cloud.”

The nominations submission deadline is 15th August 2019 and shortlisted companies announced afterwards. The winners will be announced on the evening of 26th September at the Awards ceremony at the Mövenpick Ambassador Hotel Accra.

For more information and to nominate for the awards  visit www.datacloudafrica.com/awards[[$links]]

Vodacom Tanzania extends cloud partnership with Optiva

Optiva Inc., an innovative software provider of mission-critical, cloud-native, monetization solutions to leading communication service providers (CSPs) globally,has announced that Vodacom Tanzania has expanded its partnership with Optiva for utilization of Optiva Charging Engine™ and Policy Control (PCRF).

The multiyear agreement enables Vodacom Tanzania to upgrade its current platform and support and take another step toward leveraging Optiva’s innovative cloud-native BSS architecture.

As the leading CSP in Tanzania serving over 12.4 million customers, Vodacom Tanzania differentiates itself with the best quality, coverage and superior customer experience. They have been utilizing Optiva solutions for more than 10 years to help them successfully remain ahead of their competition.

This expansion and upgrade allow them to quickly launch new, flexible and personalized products and services engineered to capture additional market share and deliver enhanced customer experiences.

The partnership with Optiva aligns with Vodacom Tanzania’s past success and revenue growth from the launch of innovative campaigns, promotions and digital services that have fulfilled market demand and countered cost-driven market disruption.

Hisham Hendi, CEO of Vodacom Tanzania said: “Optiva and Vodacom Tanzania have been long-standing partners, and this agreement further strengthens our ties. Optiva’s solutions, with the leading cloud-native architecture, and our close working collaboration allow us to capture the market opportunities faster and stay ahead of our competition.”

Danielle Royston, CEO of Optiva said:“We are thankful for our continued partnership with Vodacom Tanzania and their trust in us to extend our relationship long-term. By working closely with our customers to understand their business, our focus on Customer Success helps them to grow their subscriber base and win in their markets. Add the game-changing advantage of moving to the cloud with its promise of 80% lower total cost of ownership, and it’s a winning combination.”

www.vodacom.co.tz

www.optiva.com

afriQloud – Time for more African businesses to move to the cloud

The African cloud has arrived. Yesterday, afriQloud went live in Uganda, with plans to launch in 15  additional African countries in 2020. 

afriQloud will provide, at internationally competitive rates, local and foreign customers with an innovative and secure distributed edge cloud service.  It is a product of pan-African connectivity provider, BringCom, science and technology investor, Imprimatur Capital, and European edge cloud software company GIG Technology.

afriQloud comes at a time when African businesses are making massive investments in things like machine learning and artificial intelligence tools and are using cloud and virtualized infrastructure to enhance service delivery. Large retail firms are using compute capabilities and AWS databases to transform how they reach a predominantly mobile and digital customer base. And scores of African cloud-native startups are leveraging the cloud to disrupt entire industry sectors.

The cloud services sector in the continent might be in its early stages of development, the impact of cloud services is already far-reaching. 

Why is afriQloud important?

Well, as I mentioned earlier African businesses and organisations are making massive investments in cloud services. In fact, for African markets, cloud, virtualization and the broader evolution towards serverless computing are the most disruptive technology developments since the advent of the mobile payment revolution. 

Hans van Linschoten, founding partner of Imprimatur Capital Africa and CEO of afriQloud said in a statement yesterday  “We see significant potential in the growing African cloud market where an estimated $2 billion is being spent in cloud this year’’

Most of Africa’s content on the internet is however hosted on servers outside the continent. afriQloud is bringing those servers to Africa and African businesses need to take advantage of this. Businesses will now be able to access virtual IT technology and infrastructure; streamlined software and applications; and efficient backups and disaster recovery systems. Cloud technology provides access to software that ultimately reduces costs on so many levels, and can be customised to best suit the relevant business, it is the perfect solution for SMEs in Africa to ensure they remain competitive in the global market.

Opening up of the global market according to Fabrice Langreney, CEO of BringCom will require African companies and organizations to be equally competitive in the deployment of e-solutions, scalability, secure data accessibility and connectivity in line with international standards. This will also help them to design their own map to cloud success. By doing so, African businesses have almost limitless paths and roadways that they can draw – and reshape – to help drive their business growth.

Remember the solution for Africa’s challenges will come from within Africa. Technology is the same all over the world; the difference lies in building solutions that answer and address local socio-economic challenges. With afriQloud, companies in Africa can now emerge from a situation where they have had more rudimentary applications and business processes to where they have unleashed the power of cloud technologies which makes it easier and far more efficient to automate services.

‘’…..and we’re excited to bring this service to the continent. By the end of 2019, we will complement the few developed markets clouds with a powerful and local distributed cloud in at least 15 countries. This ensures data sovereignty for institutions and governments within Africa’s shores.”  Hans van Linschoten concluded. 


www.afriqloud.com