[Column] Andrew Cruise: Hybrid cloud and multicloud – is there a difference and does it matter?

Vendor neutral cloud infrastructure provider, Routed, says that the archetypal hybrid or multicloud concept has become needlessly complicated. Managing Director, Andrew Cruise, explains: “Ultimately no-one ever takes a pure route and even pure public cloud does not exist. So, let’s just call it cloud and understand that it covers a variety of scenarios.”

Cruise adds that while hybrid cloud is defined as a combination of public cloud and private cloud, and multicloud an extension of hybrid cloud into multiple public clouds, no enterprise deploys their infrastructure in such a linear or elegant fashion: corners are cut, and easy options are taken.

One clear trend emerging in the current environment is the difficulty of clear collaboration among cloud providers. “Providers of cloud platforms prefer to offer unique services specific to their platform where the end user experience is typically very different across said platforms. Where collaboration is possible it’s through open APIs, but this lowest common denominator outcome means only the most basic and standard functions and services are easy to port between platforms,” says Cruise.

In contrast, the VMWare Cloud approach combines the benefits of hyperscalers, plus local VMware Cloud verified operators, plus private cloud foundation deployments to give the enterprise a consistent experience.  “As much as developers try to standardise on one set of tools e.g. Kubernetes, each of the global powerhouses will attempt to offer extensions or integrations of their own to make their offering more attractive and ultimately more sticky,” says Cruise.

He adds that there is a definite need and place for more niche cloud platforms outside of the major hyperscalers because there will never be a one-size-fits-all solution from any global mega cloud provider. “Local operators will always be able to offer specific solutions to local requirements. Local cloud operators can often offer a more tailored experience to smaller and medium sized enterprises than is possible when dealing with a faceless global public cloud corporation.”

Rather than erroneously imagining that multicloud is achieved simply by using Office365 and running your website on AWS, Cruise says it should be seen as connecting privately between owned infrastructure (which might be on VMware), hyperscalers like AWS / Azure / GCP and/or other local cloud operators. “Initially the strategy may be to share data, but the goal is to facilitate the seamless migration of applications, either VM or container based, to the platform which is most suitable for the application at the time.”

Andrew Cruise is the managing director at Routed.

[Cloud] Phil Lewis: Ensuring Confidence with Cloud-based Warehouse Management

When companies rely on a dated warehouse management system (WMS) to run distribution centers, it’s not uncommon for the IT staff familiar with the system to move on. Unfortunately, this leaves the company without an in-house expert to manage issues as they arise. Added to this, if the original vendor is no longer supporting that version of the system, it can be incredibly difficult to get the system back up and running.

“Over time, each organisation builds the distribution ecosystem that uniquely addresses its needs. The challenge emerges when only a handful of people understand how to manage and maintain that system successfully and perhaps only one individual truly understands the complete picture,” says Phil Lewis, Infor’s VP of Solution Consulting EMEA. “With a mission critical WMS and corresponding data at the very core of the business, any scenario that puts it at risk can be detrimental to getting products out the door.”

For many organisations, the realisation that the “go-to” people who fully understand all the nuances in the business’ operations – and the systems that support them – are no longer there, comes too late. Whether this loss comes through resignation, retirement, health issues, or merger and acquisition, finding replacements when running a legacy on-premise WMS can become an exceedingly difficult task. How can organisations ensure the continuity of day-to-day operations with the potential loss of technical expertise?

One of the ways to mitigate this risk is to accelerate cloud migration. By shifting the WMS to the cloud, organisations are supported by a comprehensive solution that is continuously updated. This guards against new trends forcing upgrades to the system down the road. “A trusted cloud partner should have a substantial investment in IT personnel that would be difficult for some of the largest organisations to match. A small army is dedicated to monitoring the organisation’s WMS and its data to ensure both optimisation and protection,” adds Lewis.

A recent CIO tech priorities survey by IDG showed that “despite increased budgets and interest in new technologies that can positively impact business in the future, organisations still face familiar challenges to adoption. The top challenges that IT leaders encounter are lack of sufficient budget (48%), lack of staff (46%), and lack of skill sets (42%).” 

It’s time to shift the responsibility of managing and maintaining the organisation’s WMS over to a cloud provider with modern capabilities. “With this approach, organisations will not only create an opportunity to reset expectations and priorities for their IT staff, but also ensure their WMS always has the support it needs to stay up and running so that customers receive their orders on-time and in-full,” concludes Lewis. 

Phil Lewis is the Vice President Solution Consulting for Infor EMEA.

[Kenya] AAR Insurance partners with Safaricom to migrate to the cloud

AAR Insurance has inked a deal with telecommunications provider Safaricom to roll out new technology infrastructure based on the Amazon Web Services (AWS) as part of its goal to be a full digital insurance company.

The medical underwriter has begun migrating its digital tools and core systems to the AWS platform in a move that will offer clients more secure and efficient digital services.

The AWS cloud computing service will also help interface AAR Insurance digital channels – Mobile Apps, USSD services, web portals and chatbots – with the company’s core insurance technology systems thus enhancing operational efficiency while reducing costs and service downtime.

AAR Insurance Kenya Managing Director, Nixon Shigoli, says migrating all the core insurance platforms and business Applications to AWS will help the company achieve its strategic goals on digital transformation including moving all client interactions to mobile.

“AWS offers services that are affordable and flexible to grow with us as our business evolves. Besides providing enhanced and robust security features to support our business data infrastructure, AWS is reliable and customizable to our unique environment,” said Mr. Shigoli.

He added that Cloud infrastructure is critical to AAR operations as it will enable rapid deployment of Applications and is easy to adjust as needs and resource demands change.

“Moving our information assets, core systems and digital tools to the Cloud presents attractive opportunities for the realization of our goal of being a full digital insurance provider, by creating an environment for customers to enjoy end-to-end services through their phones and digital devices,” he added.

The AWS Cloud service uses the pay-as-you-go model meaning AAR Insurance will no longer have to deploy expensive hardware infrastructure on premise.

On his part, Safaricom CEO Peter Ndegwa says the AWS Cloud infrastructure offers businesses, including insurance firms, a highly scalable and secure experience to grow and support digital channels.

“AAR Insurance Kenya becomes the first insurance company locally for whom we are implementing the AWS Cloud platform. We are delighted to be part of the digital transformation at AAR and overall growth of digital insurance in Kenya,” said Mr. Ndegwa.

He pointed out that an increasingly digital consumer ecosystem requires robust technology infrastructure to support web Applications among other critical tools underpinning a superior customer experience.

“Cloud is the new normal and most businesses today have either already moved their operations into the cloud or are in the process of migrating,” explained the Safaricom boss.

So far, AAR Insurance has rolled out a number of digital platforms through which clients can enroll and pay for medical, travel and personal accident insurance, manage and track treatment expenses, using phones and other devices. They can also interact real-time with AAR Insurance through WhatsApp.

www.aar-insurance.com

www.safaricom.co.ke

[Column] Pedro Guerreiro: Cloud as a tool to create certainty

The speed with which Africa’s business sector has changed over the past year has been nothing short of astonishing.

Business leaders across the continent have had their hands full, from enabling remote work on a previously unprecedented scale to adapting to disruptions in the global supply chain, enabling e-learning for millions of youth – not to mention ensuring business continuity in the midst of a once-in-a-generation crisis.

Some changes in behaviour – such as the growing adoption of online shopping, telemedicine and digital channels for engaging with service providers – are likely to outlive the pandemic. Other behaviours – such as in-person teaching and working from the office at least some of the time – are likely to return once it’s safe.

Organisations need the flexibility to adapt to these multi-faceted changes while also improving the accuracy of the decisions they make regarding which route to take.

Speed or certainty?

McKinsey believes speed has been a fundamental aspect of the pandemic and will continue to play a leading role in guiding how businesses should adapt to ongoing uncertainty. The argument is that, by prioritising speed, organisations could make rapid decisions, act on emerging opportunities more quickly, and so improve their chances at overcoming the immense challenges created by the twin forces of digital disruption and the global pandemic.

Speed is certainly important, but there is no competitive advantage in making poor decisions quickly. The prevailing disruption and continued volatility requires that business leaders make decisions with certainty.

To make good decisions, business leaders need accurate sources of data, and the tools to turn that data into insights that can guide decision-making in real time. The modern business environment is simply too complex and volatile to rely entirely on so-called intuitive decision-making. Good quality, accurate and complete data integrated to an intelligent suite of business applications gives decision-makers greater scope for decisions that shift the needle of the business.

For example, responding well to changing customer demands is nearly impossible without knowing what those demands are. Having access to customer experience management tools that can track customer expectations in real time and guide how the business responds to those expectations removes much of the trial and error of manual decision-making. Integrating the customer experience management tool with an automation layer further increases both the speed and accuracy of that response.

Hybrid work models raise the stakes

The impact of the pandemic means most organisations are operating on a fragmented basis. Teams are working from home, making in-person methods of employee engagement and performance management almost totally obsolete, at least for the moment.

Without new employee engagement tools that can effectively mobilise and support teams around common business objectives, organisations could see falling productivity and negative effects on aspects such as product development or customer experience.

New management tools can provide measurable insights into the employee experience, which can assist managers and leaders with making better decisions over the types of support they need to provide to their teams.

Advances in data and analytics also bring data-driven insights into the boardroom, with technology solutions that connect the top floor with the shop floor to give C-level executives granular insight into the total performance of the business.

To harness data and technology for greater certainty in decision-making, organisations need to put certain building blocks in place.

Tools to create certainty in decision-making

In order to achieve a single accurate view over the organisation and empower decision-makers with actionable insights, organisations need to build intelligent enterprise capabilities.

In simple terms, this means using the latest technologies to turn insight into action across every aspect of the business, in real time. Integrated business applications – such as enterprise resource planning and human capital management solutions – powered by next-generation technologies such as artificial intelligence help transform end-to-end business processes.

Experience management solutions give insight to the sentiment of customers, partners and employees, while business process intelligence and automation enable organisations to immediately act on insights and opportunities.

At the foundation of the intelligent enterprise is cloud, which gives organisations the ability to simplify and scale their systems landscape without sacrificing performance.

Cloud empowers businesses with the certainty of a quicker time-to-value, without the upfront capital outlays required of on-premise deployments.

With cloud-enabled intelligent enterprise capabilities, organisations can achieve the speed needed to stay ahead of competitors and other disruptors while maintaining the certainty of measured, data-driven decision-making.

And with new tools such as RISE with SAP, organisations can start building intelligent enterprise capabilities no matter what stage of their digital transformation journeys they find themselves.

Pedro Guerreiro is the Managing Director Central Africa at SAP Africa

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[Africa Cloud Review] Simon Ngunjiri: Cloud adoption has reached new heights

Driven in part by the pandemic, cloud computing adoption across Africa has reached new heights. Globally, Enterprise spending on cloud infrastructure bypassed spending on data center hardware and software for the first time in 2020 according to the latest data from Synergy Research Group.

The data shows that enterprise spending on cloud infrastructure services (IaaS, PaaS, and hosted private cloud combined) grew by 35% to reach almost $130 billion in 2020, while enterprise spending on data center hardware and software dropped by 6% to less than $90 billion over the same period.

In Africa,  mass movement to remote work and increasing uptake of digital communications tools has led to increased adoption of cloud. ID had already predicted this rise to happen in 2021 noting that Migration to cloud will help fuel a 2.8% growth in IT spending in the Middle East, Africa and Turkey this year, after a slump due to the pandemic. 

This migration has certainly revolutionized the way African enterprises conduct their businesses, offering various benefits such as cost-effective access to computing power, on-demand applications, and services among others. Cloud-based office applications have increasingly become vital components of the African modern workplace. 

In 2020, IT spending was hit hard by the pandemic and declined by 4.9% in the META region, according to IDC. The crisis caused by the pandemic, though, appears to have accelerated plans for digital transformation and related projects such as migration to cloud technology.

“The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent economic fallout has accelerated digital transformation across the region, spurring unprecedented demand for contactless services, cloud solutions, and collaboration applications,” Jyoti Lalchandani, vice president and regional managing director at IDC says. 

Spending on public cloud services in the region according to IDC will grow 26.7% to top $3.7 billion. Spending on SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS will grow 24.5%, 30.6%, and 30.7%, respectively, according to the company. In addition, spending on professional cloud services will grow rapidly to total $1.6 billion.

Hybrid cloud has specifically provided enterprises in Africa with a trusted and capable foundation to adapt to changing market needs.  Hybrid cloud offers business and IT leaders the chance to meet changing business demands head-on. While continuity and business resilience are fundamental, improving customer experiences and growing revenues still features highly on the list of business objectives.

Simon Ngunjiri Muraya is Google Cloud Architect at Incentro Africa.

[Africa Cloud Review] Simon Ngunjiri: Businesses in Africa are increasing their cloud spending in 2021

In our previous Africa Cloud Review article, we highlighted how Cloud is driving change and accelerating digital transformation across multiple industries across the continent. 

This comes at a time when cloud spending among businesses continues to grow. In fact, according to data presented by TradingPlatforms.com, global public IT cloud services market revenue for 2020 was at $312.4B – a 34% Increase from 2019.

In 2016, global spending on public IT cloud services was just under $100B. In 2021 that figure has ballooned to a healthy $312.4B after experiencing a 34% increase from 2019’s $233.4B revenue. In the 4 year period from 2016-2020 the data reveals that revenue from spending on cloud services grew at an impressive compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 36.31%.

In countries like Kenya, businesses are also increasing their cloud expenditure. The “Africa in the Cloud 2020” study by World Wide Worx conducted among eight African countries released in November last year noted that Kenyan firms are set to increase their expenditure on cloud computing services by 68 per cent in 2021 up from 38 per cent in 2020. 63% of the companies interviewed in the study indicated their top reasons for cloud adoption as driving business efficiency followed by operational flexibility and customer service which averaged at 53 per cent and 45 per cent respectively.

Of the three main types of cloud services, the TradingPlatforms.com data shows that Software as a Service (SaaS) still accounts for the largest share of total revenue with a 63% share. In 2020 SaaS revenue amounted to $197.6B which is a 33% increase from 2019’s $148.5. S From 2016-2020 SaaS revenue grew at a CAGR of 34.1%.

In countries like South Africa, 51% of the public sector segment are already using cloud in production. This is according to a recent survey conducted by ITWeb and AWS on the state of cloud adoption in South Africa.

The future is in the cloud

As Patrick Ndegwa, the Business Sales Lead for SEACOM East Africa, cloud adoption is becoming increasingly important for both innovation and operational continuity.

‘’Businesses can take advantage of cloud-based applications or hosted servers for enhanced mobility, or enable remote teams to connect with each other more effectively through cloud communications. ‘’ Ndegwa says in an article published on Africa Business Communities. 

The best way for businesses to take advantage of cloud is by partnering with a reliable cloud and connectivity provider that can offer high-quality and scalable services to meet their unique business requirements. 

Simon Ngunjiri Muraya is Google Cloud Architect at Incentro Africa.

[Africa Cloud Review] Simon Ngunjiri: Cloud is accelerating digital change across different industries

Cloud technology is driving change and accelerating digital transformation across multiple industries simultaneously. According to Marilyn Moodley, the South African Country Leader for SoftwareONENot only is cloud technology itself evolving at pace in Africa, but the way organisations buy and manage software is having to adapt as well. 

In our previous Africa cloud review article, we highlighted how cloud services have certainly revolutionized the way African enterprises conduct their businesses, offering various benefits such as cost-effective access to computing power, on-demand applications, and services among others.

Recent data presented by TradingPlatforms.com, global public IT cloud services market revenue for 2020 also shows how the cloud industry earned an estimated revenue of over $300 billion globally. To be precise, the revenue was at $312.4B – a 34% Increase from 2019.

In 2016, the data shows that global spending on public IT cloud services was just under $100B. In 2021 that figure has ballooned to a healthy $312.4B after experiencing a 34% increase from 2019’s $233.4B revenue. In the 4 year period from 2016-2020 revenue from spending on cloud services grew at an impressive compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 36.31%.

The data shows how big the cloud market is. In continents like Africa for example, Hybrid cloud is providing enterprises with a trusted and capable foundation to adapt to changing market needs. As Tonny Tugee the MD at SEACOMEast Africa notes, today, businesses around the world are relying increasingly on connectivity for conducting business transactions and payments, running apps and services in cloud environments, marketing, or simply sharing information with each other.

This also explains why companies like Google are going big on cloud in Africa with Google cloud. With 24 regions and 73 zones in 17 countries, Google Cloud delivers high-performance, low-latency cloud services to customers with partners like Incentro Africa. A couple of weeks ago, Google announced it will be offering Android and cloud development scholarships to developers across  Africa. Last week, it also announced a new partnership with Shopify, a global commerce company to enable Shopify’s more than 1.7 million merchants to have access to Google Cloud’s technology across a broader set of regions.

With increasing connectivity and availability of reliable and cheap internet across Africa, it has changed the way people work. Cloud is a leapfrog technology, comparable to the introduction of the mobile phone and we are just at the beginning of it.

Simon Ngunjiri Muraya is Google Cloud Architect at Incentro Africa.

[Column] Marilyn Moodley: A digitised supply chain has become a necessity for building business efficiency

Cloud technology is driving change and accelerating digital transformation across multiple industries simultaneously. Not only is cloud technology itself evolving at pace, but the way organisations buy and manage software is having to adapt as well.

Marilyn Moodley, Country Leader for South Africa and WECA (West, East, Central Africa) at SoftwareONE, says navigating multiple systems, processes, and software licence agreements presents a significant challenge. “Software is one of the largest expenses for many organisations. But the buying, optimising and management of that software requires the right balance between tools and digitisation, processes and expertise that work together to reduce costs and the administrative burden on IT and procurement teams.”

She says the bourgeoning number of enterprise applications means IT procurement and asset managers are under increasing pressure to deliver efficiencies and cost savings while improving user experience through faster response times and automation strategies. “Taking into account the resources required to manage licenses and user requests, ensure compliance, and manage spend, organisations are constantly looking for ways to eliminate unnecessary IT costs and optimise contracts across their software and cloud portfolios.”

Moodley explains that IT Procurement functions need to evolve into connected, efficient and digitised operations to address business demands more rapidly and effectively. A software Digital Supply Chain (DSC) is created through a seamless, integrated set of systems and activities across the software lifecycle to support these goals through automating and expediting the purchase of approved products in a portfolio while streamlining the process of requesting and acquiring new software products and services, via the right channels.

“Ineffective software procurement processes pose compliance challenges as businesses don’t have on-demand access to the right information regarding their license entitlements and contract use rights, such as any applicable geographic restrictions or their renewal options that would let them make the right buying decisions,” says Moodley.

“Establishing a system of records, that holds trustworthy software entitlements and contracts data, combined with insights & analytics is one of the largest challenges facing organisations today, and a lack of an effective digital supply chain makes that even harder to accomplish. Missing renewal deadlines due to lack of visibility and monitoring is not only detrimental to productivity, it leaves little time to prepare for contract negotiations,” says Moodley.

She adds that because cloud and software are often some of the largest investments a company makes, it makes sense to take digital supply chain management seriously as a means of improving an organisation’s bottom line. 

In addition to improved efficiencies, cost savings, and overall end-user experience, an effective digital supply chain embeds automation by eliminating time-consuming manual tasks and ensuring the right software is in the hands of the right user at the right time.

“Despite this, very few businesses have the tools to ensure that this spend is continuously cost-optimised and aligned with business objectives,” says Moodley.

SoftwareONE’s Digital Supply Chain (DSC) service, powered by the PyraCloud platform, solves a multitude of challenges by providing organisations with the right mix of tools, automated workflows and experts to more closely align software purchases to business requirements. The service allows customers to easily and effectively transact software licenses and cloud subscriptions; view the entire on-premises and cloud software estate; manage contracts; track, control and predict cloud spend across multiple providers; and identify cost saving opportunities across the entire software estate.

Moodley says there is a growing interest in this area. “As South African organisations mature their cloud strategies, business leaders are seeing the inherent value and importance of streamlining their supply chains. International examples are very instructive, as Omnico, a leading global guest engagement technology company headquartered in the UK, halved its cloud spend costs using SoftwareONE’s PyraCloud and managed cloud services. South African organisations who want to remain competitive should be putting a digital supply chain in place if they haven’t already.”

Marilyn Moodley is the South African Country Leader for SoftwareONE.

Global spending on cloud Services surpasses $300 billion, report

Cloud Services have become an integral part of business operations for many large companies and in 2020 the industry earned an estimated revenue of over $300 billion globally.

According to data presented by TradingPlatforms.com, global public IT cloud services market revenue for 2020 was at $312.4B – a 34% Increase from 2019.

In 2016, global spending on public IT cloud services was just under $100B. In 2021 that figure has ballooned to a healthy $312.4B after experiencing a 34% increase from 2019’s $233.4B revenue. In the 4 year period from 2016-2020 revenue from spending on cloud services grew at an impressive compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 36.31%.

Of the three main types of cloud services, Software as a Service (SaaS) still accounts for the largest share of total revenue with a 63% share. In 2020 SaaS revenue amounted to $197.6B which is a 33% increase from 2019’s $148.5. S From 2016-2020 SaaS revenue grew at a CAGR of 34.1%

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) held the second-largest share of the revenue accounting for 21.5% of total revenue. IaaS experienced the largest growth among the three main types of cloud services with a 37% increase in revenue from $49B in 2019 to $67.2B in 2020. From 2016-2020 IaaS had a staggering CAGR of almost 40%.

Platform as a Service (PaaS) revenue accounts for just 15% of total revenue and experienced a 32.6% increase from $35.9B in 2019 to $47.6B in 2020. PaaS experienced a CAGR of 42.42% from 2016-2020, the highest out of the three main types of cloud services despite experiencing the lowest YoY growth.

Rex Pascual, editor at Trading Platforms, commented: “The cloud services industry was already gathering strong momentum prior to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. Lockdowns across the world resulted in many businesses rapidly shifting to cloud-based services giving the industry its highest YoY growth to date. Expect the industry to sustain this growth as many more businesses see the value in the adaptability of cloud services even in a post-pandemic world.”

www.tradingplatforms.com

Shopify expands partnership with Google Cloud to enable global growth

Google Cloud and Shopify, a global commerce company, have announced an expanded partnership that will enable Shopify’s more than 1.7 million merchants to have access to Google Cloud’s technology across a broader set of regions.

And, by leveraging Google Cloud’s power-efficient resources globally, Shopify is working to reduce its overall carbon footprint while delivering a better experience for merchants and their consumers.

In 2020, Shopify merchants generated nearly $120 billion in gross merchandise volume, as more businesses moved online in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and accelerated shifts in consumer behavior.

 As the demand for ecommerce continues to increase, Shopify’s expanded partnership with Google Cloud will bring data processing and storage closer to merchants in more regions, to further improve store speed and performance.

In 2020, Shopify’s revenue increased 86% year-over-year and Black Friday sales grew 75% from the previous year.

The demand for independent, direct-to-consumer shopping is only increasing, and this extended partnership between Shopify and Google Cloud will mean small- and medium-sized businesses globally will have even more access to world-class infrastructure to effectively handle all levels of traffic.

As a part of this partnership, Shopify will leverage Google Cloud’s global infrastructure to reduce latency and give shoppers more personalized, engaging experiences, including:

Google Cloud’s network of 25 regions and 76 availability zones around the world provides lower latency and higher reliability, allowing Shopify to provide a fast, highly-available service to merchants around the world.

Google’s Global Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) will make it easier for Shopify to write and deploy applications that span multiple regions.

In-country disaster recovery will help Shopify maintain business continuity across the globe.

Google Cloud’s services will assist Shopify in meeting various regulatory, security, and compliance requirements, which vary region-to-region and country-to-country. 

The cleanest cloud in the industry, Google Cloud is helping Shopify reduce its carbon footprint and achieve the company’s sustainability goals.

Additionally, Shopify will join Google Cloud’s Partner Advantage program, enabling the two companies to partner on joint go-to-market initiatives, bringing Shopify’s ecommerce platform to more businesses around the world.

“Our partnership with Google Cloud will mean that more Shopify merchants around the world have access to competitive computing technologies that would otherwise only be available to enterprise brands,” said Farhan Thawar, VP of Engineering, Shopify. “We know that during the COVID-19 pandemic from mid-March to mid-Sept, 84% of consumers have shopped online. Improved store speed and performance will give our merchants a competitive edge by allowing them to better serve buyers where they are, and it will do so in the most energy efficient way possible through Google Cloud.”

“Shopify is trusting Google Cloud to help the company scale across the globe, allowing its merchants to handle peak traffic at any time of the year,” said James Lambe, Managing Director, Google Cloud. “Over the last three years, we’ve worked with Shopify engineering to ensure its business can scale as it continues to experience rapid growth. We’re thrilled to continue on this journey together.”

www.shopify.com

www.cloud.google.com