US Data center operator Flexential partners with Angola Cables to strengthen connectivity to African markets

Leading US data center owner and developer, Flexential has opened their US network to Angola Cables to assist customers in Africa in connecting to 40 key data center hubs across the United States.  

Flexential is a leading provider of data center colocation, cloud and connectivity solutions. The company owns and operates 40 highly redundant data centers, 7 cloud nodes and manages more than 13,000 cross-connects. 

Providing access to Angola’s MONET cable, housed in Flexential’s Fort Lauderdale data center, this partnership will offer customers connectivity via the low-latency, high-capacity South Atlantic Cable System (SACS).  The alliance with Angola Cables will also address the heightened demand from enterprises, service providers, as well as hyperscale cloud providers seeking edge deployments within the US market.  

“Our partnership with Flexential will strengthen interconnection options across southern and West Africa,” said Ângelo Gama, CEO of Angola Cables. Gama says that this high-capacity connectivity is well-suited to serve multiple industries from the oil and gas sector to scientific and academic research.  

“Plugging into Flexential’s extensive network of data centers in the U.S. will benefit our clients in Africa by not only extending their presence and exposure to the highly active U.S. market but will open up further opportunities for enterprises in Africa to establish direct connections with parent companies, subsidiaries, business partners and suppliers across the U.S.” 

Tim Parker, Senior Vice President, Network Strategy at Flexential said that their focus is on building and expanding trusted relationships.  “Through this agreement we are collectively able to extend our managed services and tailored IT and data center solutions to customers and enterprises on the African continent. Given the significant presence we’re already seeing from customers, including over-the-top (OTT) providers, hyperscalers and Fortune 500 companies in the African region, we’re excited to bring these organizations a new level of international capacity and connectivity via new cross-connect options.”  

Utilizing Angola Cables’ Global Data Center Interconnect solution, customers can now access almost 60 data centers across their global network, which has significant benefits for multinational companies and enterprises that are looking for secure, low-latency connections that can manage large amounts of data and contents, safely and securely.  

“Our arrangement with Flexential presents an ideal solution for managing data traffic and promoting commerce on either side of the Atlantic whilst assisting companies in broadening and expanding their business horizons,” said Gama.  

www.angolacables.co.ao

www.flexential.com

[South Africa] Teraco announces access to Oracle Cloud via FastConnect

South African data centre company Teraco will now offer connectivity directly through Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) FastConnect at its Isando Campus for the Oracle Cloud Johannesburg Region. 

The company which is also a member of Oracle PartnerNetwork (OPN) says Oracle customers will now be able to harness the power of Oracle Cloud locally, including Oracle Autonomous Database, to help enable them to unlock innovation and drive business growth.

It says Oracle Cloud Infrastructure FastConnect, now also via Teraco’s Africa Cloud Exchange, may potentially provide higher -bandwidth options and potentially more reliable and consistent networking experience compared to Internet-based connections. 

With OCI, customers benefit from best-in-class security, consistent high performance, simple predictable pricing, and the tools and expertise needed to bring any workload to the cloud relatively quickly and efficiently.

“Our direct connections to OCI builds upon our commitment to ensure that our clients have direct, secure access to the critical IT resources they need to drive business success,” said Teraco CEO Jan Hnizdo. “The demand for Oracle Cloud in our market is a testament to its strength, and we are extremely pleased to be working closely with Oracle to accelerate their service delivery.” 

OCI’s extensive network of the currently more than 70 FastConnect global and regional partners offer customers dedicated connectivity to Oracle Cloud regions and OCI services – providing customers with potentially one of the best options anywhere in the world. 

Specifically architected to help meet the needs of the enterprise, Oracle Cloud is a next-generation cloud that delivers powerful compute and networking performance and a comprehensive portfolio of infrastructure and platform cloud services from application development and business analytics to data management, integration, security, artificial intelligence (AI), and blockchain. With unique architecture and capabilities, Oracle Cloud delivers unmatched security, performance, and cost savings. Oracle Cloud is the only cloud built to run Oracle Autonomous Database, the industry’s first and only self-driving database.

www.teraco.co.za

Acronis launches its first cloud data center in Nigeria

Acronis, a global player in cyber protection announced the availability of a new Acronis Cyber Cloud Data Center in Lagos, Nigeria.

The new data center, one of the 111 new data centers being deployed by the company, gives service provider partners access to a full range of cyber protection solutions upon which they can build new services while delivering faster access, constant data availability, and data sovereignty to their clients.  

Having these capabilities is key for Nigerian service providers today, as cyber threats loom over the business landscape and data accessibility, privacy, and compliance demands grow.

The opening of the Nigerian data center is part of the Acronis Global/Local Initiative, an effort that includes global management for all data centers, geographic redundancy, and control for local partners, and a local disaster recovery site – all with competitive pricing. The goal of this initiative is to ensure service providers will have no trouble meeting the ever-changing compliance, data sovereignty, and performance requirements they and their clients face.

During an event that took place at the heart of the city at the Lagos Oriental Hotel, leaders from the industry and special guests all gathered to celebrate, such as Tony Ojobo, President of the Board of Trustee of the ICT Foundation and Former Public Affairs Director of the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC).

The global network of Acronis Cyber Cloud Data Centers already includes more than 40 data centers. From Europe to Asia and from the US to Africa, Acronis already opened cloud data centers across the globe and is planning to open many more. With the new data center in Nigeria, local service providers will have a location within the country where they can store business-critical data for their clients. Managed service providers (MSPs) will also benefit from the full range of managed cloud solutions and cyber protection solutions available via the Acronis Cyber Cloud platform.

Chidi Oliseowe, Team Lead, Madonna Systems Nigeria Limited said: “Today the world depends so much on data to the point where we can say data is life, and data security cannot be over emphasised. We at Madonna Systems are so proud to be associated with Acronis, a foremost leader in cyber protection. With the opening of their new Data Centre in Nigeria, Acronis demonstrates its level of commitment to the Africa Market.” 

“A local presence is a necessity for modern cloud businesses and we are proud to deliver the Acronis Cyber Cloud Data Center in Nigeria,” said Peter French Regional General Manager Middle East & Africa at Acronis. “Now, Nigerian companies, and businesses from neighbour countries too, will be able to store their strategic data locally while being backed by a global partner who is on standby 24/7/365 to address any issues.”

Joel Friday, Senior Sales Manager, Promethean Consulting Limited added: “We have been an Acronis partner since 2017 and we do not see our company partnering with anyone else. It is the only cyber protection company with integrated cyber security and data protection (with back up for OEMs). Acronis building a data centre in Nigeria is a huge milestone for the industry in Nigeria. In-country data security has been a priority for most organizations in Nigeria, and the idea of a DC locally will definitely help partners like us add more value to our end users’ infrastructure.”

Service providers interested in learning more about the advantages and opportunities of cyber protection solutions available through the Acronis Cyber Cloud platform should contact our local team in Africa.

www.acronis.com

[Column] Tejpal Bedi: Kenya’s data centres – Essential infrastructure for expanding our digital economy

Although most of us don’t usually spend much time thinking about data centres, they play a fundamental role in the origin, delivery, and maintenance of Internet services and networks. And our need for them is growing as more people use the Internet to join the digital economy. Global traffic surged by more than 40% in 2020 as a result of increased video streaming, teleconferencing, online gaming, and social networking. The number of global Internet users has doubled since 2010, and with that increase comes the need for data centres that can not only cater for current requirements, but also for future loads that require even more complex computing capabilities.

In an African context, countries such as Kenya and Uganda have seen increased investment and interest from multinational operators. We see this with data centre operator Raxio launching its first carrier-neutral centre in Kampala in 2021. Other examples include PAIX building a data centre in Nairobi’s financial district, and Asteroid International expanding its Kenyan Internet exchange service from Mombasa to Nairobi. Combined with the increasing investment from hyperscalers such as AWS, Google, and Meta, the end result of this is more value for end users and enterprises in the East African region, with better speeds, better pricing, and a blossoming digital economy.

In Kenya, more data centres, and their surrounding technology infrastructure, could change how people and businesses engage with global networks and systems. To do that, it’s important to know what that infrastructure looks like, and what it is capable of. 

Inside a data centre

What do you see when you imagine a data centre? Perhaps a giant warehouse filled with endless corridors of blinking server towers, storing data or serving as a junction point through which data passes on its journey from A to B. However, today’s data centres are more complex. They are designed to support multiple on-site and cloud activities, especially when it comes to business IT. A data centre can support email and file sharing customer relationship management (CRM) platforms, enterprise resource planning (ERP) and databases, virtual desktops and communication services, as well as evolving applications in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. Centres are comprised of servers, routers, switches, firewalls, and service delivery controllers, all vital components that work together to deliver comprehensive functionality.

While there are various kinds of centres that cater to specific services, colocation centres and carrier-neutral facilities are two of the most common; both of which serve important purposes for all kinds of enterprises. Simply put, colocation centres offer a space, both physical and virtual, for companies to store and manage their servers and other infrastructure, while carrier-neutral centres are independent entities offering various connection options to customers, including direct connections and cloud services.

The impact of Kenya’s data centres

Considered the gateway to the East Africa region, Kenya plays an important geographical and logistical role in the rollout of Internet connectivity and services on the continent. Our country enjoys the presence of several local facility operators that have grown and expanded in part thanks to acquisitions or partnerships with global operators, while also offering end-to-end solutions for companies of all sizes. Investments in broadband undersea cables and landing stations enable accessibility, connecting the continent to global cloud networks and serving as the bedrock on which Kenya can embrace cutting-edge digital solutions. 

According to the Kenya Data Centre Investment Analysis Report, our data centre market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 12.36% between 2021 and 2026. Kenya serves as of one the continent’s primary data centre hubs. Nairobi is a favourable location for data centre development, with Mombasa becoming more popular with service providers as well. Data centres enable the growing adoption of big data and Internet of Things (IoT) services, while the demand for original design manufacturer (ODM) servers among operators also fuels growth in server infrastructure. These factors contribute to Kenya’s position not only as a continental leader, but also as an opportunity hotbed for technology sectors. 

Innovation, energy, and the future

Despite this potential, Africa’s hosting capacity remains minimal. The continent’s capacity is only a fraction of some of the world’s largest data centre metros, such as London or Amsterdam. However, new facility construction has accelerated as markets consider hosting and cloud service opportunities. Reliable data centre infrastructure, as offered and maintained by reputable service providers, mean users in Nairobi can utilise AI, blockchain and other digital resources with the same level of security and ease as other users in the overseas metros.

This infrastructure, and its energy requirements, also raises environmental considerations that are being addressed. Growing demand for data centres continues to be mostly offset by ongoing efficiency improvements in servers, switches, and other infrastructure. Combined with mobile networks switching from 2G and 3G technologies to more efficient 4G and 5G ones, data centres are becoming increasingly energy efficient.

From fledgling start-ups to large corporates, we can’t underestimate the importance of data centres when it comes to delivering Internet solutions and unlocking digital opportunities. With data centres offering so much to the Kenyan economy and individual businesses, it’s a good time for companies to prioritise finding reliable ICT partners and service providers of data hosting facilities.

Tejpal Bedi is the SEACOM Managing Director and Regional Head of Sales for the ENEA region.

[Africa Cloud Review] Simon Ngunjiri: Surge of companies moving to the cloud set to continue throughout 2022

On Monday, we published a column by Andrew Cruise is the managing director at Routed. In the column, Andrew notes that one thing the pandemic taught us is that remote work is a viable alternative to large, expensive offices and IT infrastructure and hardware.

Many African businesses have slashed their office space after realising that they could save money while still being fully operational remotely, and moved everything to the cloud.  

“Work from home mandated as a result of the pandemic proved to many organisations that the need for physical hardware and infrastructure is fading as fast as the idea that everyone has to work from an office,” says Cruise.

In countries like South Africa, although only around 5% of the South African enterprise market is fully on the cloud, according to Cruise, many more are now considering this option.

The pandemic as we have highlighted in a previous column has accelerated the move to the cloud.  According to data from Synergy,Cloud spend reportedly increased by 37% to $29 billion during the first quarter of 2020. Companies  Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud and Microsoft Azure also saw unprecedented demand during the early stage of the pandemic.

This surge of companies moving to the cloud is set to continue throughout 2021 as we navigate the future of work in a post-pandemic worldGartner forecasts public cloud services will grow 18.4% in 2021.

“The pandemic validated cloud’s value proposition,” says Sid Nag, research vice president at Gartner. “The ability to use on-demand, scalable cloud models to achieve cost efficiency and business continuity is providing the impetus for organizations to rapidly accelerate their digital business transformation plans. The increased use of public cloud services has reinforced cloud adoption to be the ‘new normal,’ now more than ever.”

In sub-Saharan Africa, Cloud technology has helped business manage the disruptions caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The third edition of the Cloud in Africa report, released last year notes that most of these businesses are increasingly turning to cloud to improve operational efficiency and COVID-19 has added fuel to the fire.

Moving to the cloud means you’re effectively renting hardware, which removes the hidden costs of mitigating against failures, disaster recovery and maintenance when you run your own hardware. 

Last week, Vodacom Business Africa announced that it’s expanding its Cloud Connect offering across the continent.

“Africa is experiencing a boom in digitalisation. Combined with the disruptions of COVID-19, this is driving many organisations on the continent to seek out the benefits of cloud services. says Wale Odeyemi, Executive Head of Strategic Marketing at Vodacom Business Africa.

Africa Data Centres also officially opened its new 10MW data centre facility in Lagos, Nigeria. The facility is a key part of this expansion as Nigeria is a critical African market in terms of leading the charge for hyperscale customers to deploy cloud solutions to West Africa.

Simon Ngunjiri Muraya is Google Cloud Architect at  Incentro Africa.

[Africa Cloud Review] Simon Ngunjiri: Investments in data centers in boosting the continents’ digital economy

In a previous column, we highlighted how Africa is an emerging data center market and witnessed around 15 data center investments in 2020.  The region is experiencing growth in internet penetration, which can be a major driver for data center investors.

This trend continues to grow as move investments in data centers continue to be announced. International investors are rushing to fund a boom in the African cloud computing market investing in new data centers across Africa.  

Last week, Digital Realty announced plans to acquire Medallion Data Centres, Nigeria’s leading colocation and interconnection provider. The global provider of cloud- and carrier-neutral data center, colocation, and interconnection solutions will aquire Medallion through a joint venture with Pembani Remgro Infrastructure Fund. Oracle and Orange also signed a collaboration agreement as part of a joint plan to accelerate cloud-led digital transformation in West Africa. Under the agreement, the two companies will assess plans to build Oracle Cloud regions using Orange’s infrastructure in Senegal and Ivory Coast.

Ikechukwu Nnamani the Chief Executive Officer of Medallion Data Centre Limited, in an article published on This Day Live, investments in African data centres will boost the digital economy of countries like Nigeria.

Oracle has previously also announced that it has chosen Johannesburg as the site of its first African data centre. Joburg will be among the 14 locations across Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific, and Latin America that the company says it plans to open cloud regions to support strong customer demand for Oracle Cloud services.

Vantage Data Centers announced plans to expand into Africa. The company said it had broken ground on a new 80MW campus in Johannesburg, South Africa. The first 16MW phase of development is due to be completed by the summer of 2022. Wingu.Africa partnered with Djibouti ISP TO7 Network to develop a carrier-neutral data center and carrier-neutral cable landing station. West African data center firm MDXi also announced plans to expand its Lekki Data Center in Lagos, Nigeria.The MainOne subsidiary said the Lekki II facility will be deployed on “a very aggressive timeline” and will launch the new data center in Q1 2022

Data center spending is indeed going up with research firm Gartner estimating that end-user spending on global data center infrastructure is projected to reach US$200 billion in 2021, up 6% from 2020. In Africa, the continent requires a 1000 megawatts and 700 data centers facilities according to reports.

In countries like Kenya, the market is set to grow at a CAGR of 12.36% during 2021-2026. This is according to the “Kenya Data Center – Investment Analysis & Growth Opportunities 2021-2026” report released recently.

Simon Ngunjiri Muraya is Google Cloud Architect at  Incentro Africa.

Cloud and Data Centre Provider Digital Realty To acquire Medallion Data Centres in Nigeria

Digital Realty has announced plans to acquire Medallion Data Centres, Nigeria’s leading colocation and interconnection provider.

The global provider of cloud- and carrier-neutral data center, colocation, and interconnection solutions will aquire Medallion through a joint venture with Pembani Remgro Infrastructure Fund. Pembani Remgro Infrastructure Fund is a joint initiative established by Remgro, Phuthuma Nhleko and the investment team, based in Johannesburg.

Medallion operates two data centers, one in Lagos, the most populous urban metropolitan area in Africa with approximately 15 million people, and one in Abuja, the capital of Nigeria.  Medallion’s Lagos data center is the leading connectivity hub in Western Africa with over 70 carriers and internet service providers, over 80% of the public peering traffic on the Nigerian Internet Exchange, and a peering point for all subsea cables currently operating in Nigeria with plans to serve as a peering point for the nine new subsea cables scheduled to be in operation in Lagos by 2023.

As part of the transaction, the joint venture is also acquiring a land parcel adjacent to the Lagos data center to provide near-term expansion capacity.  Medallion’s management team, led by CEO and co-founder Ike Nnamani, will continue to lead the business.

Separately, Digital Realty and Pembani Remgro Infrastructure Fund have successfully partnered with Kenyan data center operator iColo since 2019, and iColo announced today that it will enter Mozambique through the development of its first data center in the country, located in the capital and port city of Maputo.

“Over the next decade, there will be huge opportunity for global businesses to tap into Africa’s expanding internet economy – with predictions that it could reach 5.2% of the continent’s GDP by 2025, contributing nearly $180 billion to its economy (up from $115 billion in 2020).  By 2050, the internet economy has the potential to contribute $712 billion1.  Through major investment in the continent’s internet infrastructure, Digital Realty aims to be a core enabler of these economic and quality of life gains. ” William Stein, Chief Executive Officer, Digital Realty said.

“There is a huge opportunity to both meet growing customer demand for connectivity in Africa and improve the internet infrastructure that serves over one billion people2 who don’t yet have proper access to the benefits of internet.  The expansion of our platform announced today is a leap forward but it’s just the start of our $500 million commitment to investment in the continent over the next decade.  We see a huge opportunity to underpin Africa’s expanding internet economy and play a central role in its growth.” he added.

The iColo campus in Mombasa was recently expanded to deliver an additional 1.6 megawatts of power and 12,900 square feet of capacity for new and existing customers, along with the new subsea cable landing equipment.  In addition, iColo has expanded its Nairobi campus with the acquisition of an additional 215,000 square feet of land that will support 14 megawatts of future data center capacity.

Africa is evolving into a major interconnection hub for data-driven businesses that require a scalable, future-proof platform to facilitate global hybrid and multi-cloud infrastructure.  The deployment of PlatformDIGITAL®, Digital Realty’s market-leading global data center platform, across Africa will enable multinational and local businesses to rapidly scale their digital transformations by deploying critical infrastructure with a leading global data center provider at the heart of a growing connected data community in the region.

www.medallion.ng

www.digitalrealty.com

[Column] Jaco du Plooy: Creating sustainable data centres through energy-efficient solutions

With the large-scale migration of business data and IT services to the cloud – particularly in light of the global pandemic driving a 35 percent increase in online traffic – there has been a notable rise in global data centre construction.

However, while data centres remain the backbone of the internet and cloud-computing processes, they are also some of the world’s greatest energy guzzlers. The cooling systems that data centres use to maintain a temperature-controlled environment and prevent servers from overheating, for instance, use nearly 40 percent of energy 24 hours a day.

To add to this, estimates suggest data centres are responsible for up to five percent of all global greenhouse gas emissions, contributing immensely to the challenge of global warming. For this reason, it is imperative that data centre operators take accountability and actively work towards finding energy efficient solutions towards a greener future for data centres.

“The demand for data centre infrastructure continues to soar because of the exponential growth of big data. Despite its known negative environmental impact, the data centre industry can and should play an active role in helping to cut the global IT carbon footprint, by employing sustainable and efficient solutions to power, cool and maintain data centres,” says Jaco du Plooy, Product Manager at Eaton South Africa.

Energy optimisation solutions and strategies

A strategic approach to energy management can contribute considerably to not boosting data centre efficiency, but can bring an immediate and long-term power cost saving, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the load on South Africa’s already constrained national power utility, Eskom.

Most hyperscale data centres could cut their greenhouse gas emissions by 88 percent by switching to efficient equipment and improving energy management.

Cooling equipment and systems are crucial in maintaining temperature-controlled data centre environments and ensuring stable operation of hardware. Installing energy-efficient cooling systems is the first and most important step data centre operators can take towards cutting energy consumption. Systems that use a continuously variable speed fan, for instance, will result in a considerable energy saving.

It’s also a good idea to re-evaluate the operating temperatures maintained in data centres. Studies have shown that data centres can run higher than the conventional operating temperatures of between 20 to 22 degrees Celsius, without compromising the system’s reliability of optimal efficiency. This would result in power savings as chillers would not have to work as hard.

Adding renewable power to the mix can also help reduce a data centre’s overall greenhouse gas emissions by 98 percent, when used with other energy efficient strategies.

Look into how much energy the UPS systems in data centres use to convert power too. Using high-efficiency UPS systems that don’t require transformers will also boost energy efficiency by reducing consumed raw materials and lowering freight costs with a substantially smaller footprint. 

A typical day in a data centre will see varied server loads. A data centre’s servers running at full capacity when workloads and utilisation are operating at far less is a massive energy waste. Data centre facilities can boost energy management by using intelligent hardware that provides data collection, measurement, and monitoring capabilities. This will ensure optimal use of resources, while helping to identify and diagnose equipment issues that need repair or maintenance before equipment failure occurs and costs become much greater, as a result of downtime or the need to replace the equipment.

“A sustainable and greener future for the data centre industry is certainly within reach. There are many strategies and solutions organisations can employ to optimise the energy usage in data centres and ensure a reduced carbon footprint. This will prepare the industry at large for the energy transition on the horizon – the next step in the global sustainability journey,” concludes Du Plooy.

Jaco du Plooy is the Product Manager, Eaton South Africa.

[South Africa] Teraco completes its Cape Town hyperscale data centre campus expansion

Teraco Data Environments Proprietary Limited, Africa’s largest vendor-neutral data centre and interconnection services provider, has announced the completion of Phase 1 of CT2, its new hyperscale data centre in Brackenfell, Cape Town – the largest data centre in the Western Cape. The new facility supports the growing demand by enterprises and cloud providers for data centre capacity. CT2 offers highly resilient and secure colocation facilities in line with Teraco’s long-term vision of enabling digital transformation across Africa.

Cape Town, as one of Africa’s most digitally connected cities, is a logical destination for Teraco’s continued investment into data centre infrastructure on the continent. Home to thriving digitally connected enterprises including telecommunications, financial services, e-commerce, logistics, and retail; Cape Town benefits from its enviable location at the southern tip of Africa, and the landing of many major subsea cable systems such as ACE, WACS, SAT-3 and SAFE. The abundance of subsea cable connectivity is set to continue with Google’s Equiano and the 2AFRICA cable system developments.

CT2 represents a strategic addition to Platform Teraco, offering enterprises a scalable platform for IT infrastructure deployment while sustaining performance, reliability, security, and the most comprehensive network choice. The first phase of CT2 comprises 25000sqm of building structure, 8000sqm of data hall space, and 18MW of critical power load. Teraco has secured adjacent land and power for future expansion and brings the total critical power load to 36MW at end state. 

As part of Teraco’s broader Cape Town campus, both the CT1 and CT2 data centres  provide enterprises with direct access to Platform Teraco; a rich ecosystem of over 250 network providers, global cloud on-ramps, subsea cable systems, access to over 50 managed service providers, and direct peering at NAPAfrica, Africa’s largest Internet exchange point. Clients deployed in either of these facilities can connect to AWS Direct Connect and Microsoft Azure ExpressRoute directly or via Teraco’s Africa Cloud Exchange. 

This multi-billion-rand data centre facility dramatically extends Platform Teraco’s capacity in the Western Cape, according to Jan Hnizdo, CEO, Teraco: “Forming a vital part of the African IT landscape, Platform Teraco is an essential part of the modern enterprise’s digital transformation strategy with its diverse industry ecosystems and open interconnection marketplace.” CT2 is connected to all the other Teraco data centres through the diverse ecosystem of network operators in the facility, making it ideal for the distributed interconnection defined architecture of the modern enterprise.

Hnizdo says that the majority of enterprise organisations are accelerating their digital transformation strategies and placing a greater focus on cloud adoption strategies: “Enterprises are looking for the ability to scale as network strategies evolve, and in a world where fast and secure interconnection with strategic business partners is a priority, this is a source of competitive advantage.”

Platform Teraco provides the lowest latency interconnection points to both cloud and content. With a direct private connection to all leading cloud providers, enterprises can deploy in the most latency efficient, secure and resilient manner possible. Enterprises use Teraco to scale their IT infrastructure, adopt hybrid and multi-cloud architectures and interconnect with strategic business partners within the Teraco ecosystem. 

Since its inception in 2008, Teraco has focused on building highly resilient vendor-neutral data centres. “Over the last few years, we have taken our ever-expanding ecosystems and network-dense interconnection hubs, and moved beyond simple colocation. Teraco is the enterprise infrastructure platform for growth and innovation,” concludes Hnizdo.

www.teraco.co.za

Raxio Group appoints Master Power to manufacture and install its data centres in Africa

The Raxio Group a premier pan-African data centre developer and operator has appointed Master Power Technologies to build and install its multiple data centres in Africa. Master Power is a leading data centre solutions company, specialising in the supply and installation of pre-engineered data centres in the continent. 

Following its first facility in Uganda, Raxio’s next suite of data centres are being developed in Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of Congo and Mozambique in order to deliver premier colocation services to the region. The infrastructure will help drive growth to the region by supporting the rising consumption of data and the growing digital needs, while reducing the costs associated with digital access for all.

Master Power’s appointment was the result of a highly competitive bidding and evaluation process conducted by Raxio’s technical team and overseen by Raxio’s lead design consultant, Future-tech. Master Power’s scope of work across Raxio’s multiple sites will cover design localisation, supply, install and commissioning of all technical areas. Raxio’s unique and highly innovative design based on “metro-edge” principles is highly scalable and will deliver the lowest power utilization effectiveness ratio (PUE) on the continent through the choice of best-in-class energy efficient power and cooling technology.

The new Raxio data centres will continue to broaden customer access to state-of-art colocation facilities, boosting digital transformation in new markets on the continent, and providing an environment to meet the demands of the population for increased connectivity. The facilities will also be a catalyst for economic growth and job creation, while minimising the impact on the environment through an energy efficient design which does not compromise the reliability of the overall system.

Raxio facilities are designed to cater to a wide spectrum of customers delivering power densities up to 21KW per rack whilst providing the cooling required to optimally run customer equipment.

All the facilities are being designed and developed in compliance with Uptime Institute’s Tier III standard, with no single points of failure, enabling concurrent maintainability. In addition to providing power and cooling redundancy, the data centres will also enable connectivity redundancy through diverse fibre intake and meet-me rooms, all within a highly secure environment.

Founded in 1999, Master Power has built a strong reputation in continuously innovating the data centre industry across the African continent, enabling its customers to focus on their core competences and outsource data space. Since its inception, the company has built industry-leading business cases around commissioning, installing, and providing after-sales services for a comprehensive range of its turnkey backup power and data centre solutions. Master Power is a proudly African company, committed to contributing to build the continent, and has clearly demonstrated a comprehensive understanding of the Sub-Saharan Africa data centre industry.

Robert Mullins, CEO of Raxio Group said: “Working with Master Power allows us to accelerate our expansion through a more streamlined and optimized design-to-commissioning process across multiple sites. Master Power’s long-established track-record of successful installations across the African continent and a highly-skilled team, as well as its ability to tailor its solutions to meet the requirements of our unique design were key criteria in our selection process. Together with our own resources and technical partners we are convinced we have a winning combination to deliver these paradigm-shifting facilities to the region. In addition to this, our shared vision to enable digital transformation across Africa, driving economic growth and opportunities for the entire population makes Master Power the ideal choice for us.”

Menno Parsons, CEO of Master Power said: “Digital infrastructure is desperately needed in Africa as connectivity becomes available to more of the population. Working with Raxio to build its next suite of data centres is critical in helping to support the growing demand for colocation services across the region, and we are very pleased to be able to support the rollout of such unique, next-generation facilities. Our experience in the region and Raxio’s commitment to help grow Africa’s digital communities means we will be able to increase the infrastructure available in key regions.”

www.raxiogroup.com